Accident on the Parks Hwy, diesel spilled

This truck wrecked on the Parks Highway yesterday.  The driver is fine but he was cited for negligent driving.  The accident spilled about 2000 gallons of diesel into a ditch.  Below is a link to a short article in the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner about it.

http://www.newsminer.com/news/local_news/fuel-tanker-spills-gallons-in-parks-highway-crash/article_b4c220f2-e851-11e4-9c95-cfcef7850e83.html

 

Accident on the Parks Highway

Photo by Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities via Newsminer.com

 

Driver has a bad day

Another truck goes off the road!  This one is about 20 miles from Prudhoe.

Happy Sunday everyone!  We’re having a beautiful sunny day after some snow and a wind storm that cut out our electricity for a couple of hours last night.

 

Pushing a crane

It’s quite common for a really heavy load to have one or more push trucks behind it to push when going up inclines.  Push trucks are commonly used on the Dalton Highway as well as the Parks and Richardson when the loads are outrageously heavy, otherwise it would take a very long time and so much fuel for the truck with the load to get up a mountain, and it would also impede traffic for long periods of time.  The push trucks just follow the load when not going up hills.

Taken 11 years ago, these photos really show how close Jack’s push truck gets to the load he’s pushing (a crane).  You can see the pad that the push bar pushes against, how the trucks make contact.

Curved directional pipe for crude oil

Crude oil pipe on truckI snapped these on Friday when this truck was fueling up to head north.Crude oil pipe on truck

Jack says they are used for crude oil and that they lay on their sides, not upright like on the truck. You can see the actual metal portion of the pipe that is colored green with anti-corrosion paint.  The black is thinner metal and in between the two is foam insulation.

This load is obviously going to Deadhorse or Prudhoe Bay.  (FYI:  Deadhorse refers to the “town” where companies have their operations, and Prudhoe Bay refers to the actual oil fields and is a much larger area.)

Click on the photos for larger images.

 

Truck in the ditch

More snow in the engine, but this time it’s from someone going in the ditch!  It seems to happen to everyone eventually and it’s better to land in the cushy snow instead of just about anywhere else.  After it got pulled out they cleaned the snow off and drove it away!

(Identifying marks have been removed for privacy.)

Hauling Pipe Rack Units to Prudhoe

A few years ago Jack and some other truckers took these pipe rack units from Fairbanks to Alpine, an area of Prudhoe Bay owned by Conoco-Phillips.  You’ll see the units being loaded, then Jack driving behind other units. You can see the pipes in the middle of the structure as well as the valve controls on the top.  These units are lined up next to each other and connected as part of the process of extracting oil and getting it into the pipeline to go south.  In one of the ice road photos you can see a pipeline on the right.

They drive through tundra, over mountains, and finally on the ice roads of Prudhoe Bay.  The last couple of photos, the ones where the road doesn’t look particularly icy, they are passing over a river.  If you are also rather astute (and here I am giving you a clue) you can also see Jack’s reflection in the mirror, as well as a reflection of the small fan that he had mounted on the dash that could turn toward the windshield to defrost it or toward him on hot days.

(The best way to view the photos is to click on the first one and then click on the right arrow.)

Broken Bridge Beam

This short video was taken a couple of years ago when a truck carrying a bridge beam went off the road and flopped over.   It was a costly problem for whoever ended up paying for it.  It broke in the wreck so they tore it into pieces and hauled it away.

 

 

The Donjek River Bridge, Canada

Some memories are dictated much by the weather.  Storms, wind, rain, and very often, sun.  Sometimes the sun falls just right, and the breeze is peaceful, and you’re in a good place. It might so happen that it’s 40 below, but some things can’t be helped.

This is my single favorite photo of Jack. It is November 2006.  His face is a little stiff from the cold but the afternoon setting sun shows how much he enjoys this crazy job of taking big things to faraway places.

Jack Jessee

In this case he gets to bring bridge beams to the Donjek River in Yukon Territory, Canada.

Jack JesseeThe old bridge is behind Jack.

Bridge Beam

Jack actually helped haul the bridge beams in the summer and is now (November 2006) back in the winter to pick them up again and bring them down to the crane on the ice.

Bridge Beam

 There are two cranes used to pick up the bridge beam.  The yellow piece that is at the right in the photo above is hanging from the other crane which is behind the person taking the photo (Jack).

Semi-truck

The trucks are awaiting another bridge beam to load.

Semi-truck with trailerThis is the dolly used to haul the bridge beams.

Jack JesseeJack is wearing a face mask, but no gloves!  No figure.

Bridge The arrow is pointing to the bridge beams already placed where they will forever stay.

bridge building

bridge building  Below is a Google Earth image of the Donjek River.  You can see the new bridge and the old road leading up to the river but the old bridge has been dismantled and removed.

Donjek River

Have a great day!