Driving into Prudhoe Bay

 

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Chucky’s Corner

Here’s two 2-minute clips of a section of the road that is about 130+ miles from Fairbanks.  At the beginning, Jack passes by Chucky’s Corner on the right.  Chucky was a trucker who lost his life on that corner and it’s memorialized with the name, and the cross.

Bizarre convoy of track rigs

Travel to another planet with Jack when he drives by one otherworldly track rig after another.  This might be the best video yet so don’t give up half way through when there’s a lull in the traffic…there are more of these crazy rigs coming!  (There’s music but it’s quiet at the beginning.)

Dalton Highway road construction – June 6 (1 of 3)

The first ten or so of these photos are from when Jack drove into Prudhoe Bay June 6th.  The rest are from when he was leaving Prudhoe about 4 hours later.  The place is barely recognizable.  There’s more info on the captions. Click on the first one and scroll to the right.

The Dalton Highway is passable once again

From the Alaska Department of Transportation website:

The first vehicles traveling south on the Dalton Highway, Mile 413. ADOT&PF photo.

The first vehicles traveling south on the Dalton Highway, Mile 413. ADOT&PF photo. (CLICK TO ENLARGE)

(PRUDHOE BAY, Alaska) – The Dalton Highway has reopened to traffic after an 18-day closure caused by massive spring breakup flooding.

Traffic began moving on the road at 8 a.m. this morning. The highway is open to two-way traffic, but drivers will encounter a section with flaggers and pilot car at Mile 412-414. The road remains in rough condition through the flood zone at Miles 392-414, with multiple narrow sections and an uneven surface. Drivers are urged to travel slowly and watch for signs.

The reopening of the highway marks a milestone for the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT&PF), which has been handling the Dalton flood response since the initial overflow problems in March. The cost of this spring’s emergency response totals $15.5 million.

Flooding on the section of highway south of Deadhorse began in mid-March when overflow from the Sagavanirktok (Sag) River began spilling onto the highway. River aufeis accumulated in the bottom of the shallow and braided river and pushed the flowing water to the top, though temperatures in the area remained below freezing.

For more go to http://dot.alaska.gov/comm/pressbox/arch_2015/PR15-2534.shtml#

Dalton Highway, April 16th & 17th

These photos are the last of the ones Jack took from when the road was in bad condition.  It’s much improved now, to the point where Jack says there’s nothing to take photos of.  When the melt starts up there though, who knows what will happen.

Heavy Equipment (one that floats!)

Here are the rest of the photos from when Jack drove through the flooded area, the portion of the road that was recently closed because of the overflow of the Sag River onto the Dalton.  There is a HUGE tracked vehicle that Jack says can float!  I can’t see how that’s possible but supposedly, if it breaks through the ice, it won’t sink to the bottom of whatever it is on.  In his case it’s a matter of a few feet to the ground.  But it’s just hard to imagine either way.

Click on the first one and scroll to the right.